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Adriana Allen found $1,800 worth of temptation sticking out of a drive-through ATM Sunday in Boynton Beach.

Adriana Allen

The bank was closed. No car in front of her. And there for the taking was a stack of money dangling from the deposit slot.

But for Allen, that was somebody else’s money — not a windfall that could cover a mortgage payment or finance a shopping spree for the 46-year-old school crossing guard from Boca Raton.

“I drove up to the ATM and there was $1,800 waiting for me,” Allen said Monday. “But it’s just not right. … That’s the way I was brought up. What you don’t earn, you don’t get.”

First, Allen tried to feed the money into the deposit slot, but it just wouldn’t go, according to the police report.

So she took the money — helping the next ATM user avoid temptation — and called the police.

“They couldn’t believe that I was calling for that,” said Allen, who had just come from a mall shopping trip when she found the money.

A Boynton Beach police officer arrived at the Chase bank branch at 555 N. Congress Ave.

There with Allen, the officer counted the $1,800, all in $100 bills.

“It’s a good story,” Police Department spokeswoman Stephanie Slater said. “This woman is a great example of what you should do.”

While giving back the money is the legal, and many would say moral, obligation, how many other people would turn away from the chance to pocket $1,800 during these tough economic times?

HONEY, I DON’T KNOW..I KNOW RIGHT FROM WRONG BUT MY BILLS DON’T!

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