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Manarola, Cinque Terre, Liguria, Italy (© Design Pics/SuperStock)

The charming fishing village of Manarola is the oldest of the five northern coastal towns that make up the Italy’s Cinque Terre, and it is among the smallest. The multicolored buildings that reflect the rich Italian sunlight are a perfect starting point for the Love’s Walk (Via dell’Amore), which leads between Manarola and nearby Riomaggiore.

 

Colorful houses on Burano Island, Venice, Italy (© giovanni cavalli/age fotostock)

the cheery fishing village of Burano, Venice is known for its lace — and a kaleidoscope of painted houses.

 

Colored houses in a row in Longyearbyen, Norway (© age fotostock / SuperStock)

Each November to January, Longyearbyen is cloaked in darkness as the sun sinks below the horizon for the “polar night.” You could hardly blame the 1,800 people who live here for wanting to add vivid color to their environment.

 

Bo-kaap, colourful houses, Malay quarter, Capetown (Kaapstad), Western Cape, South Africa

The Cape Town neighborhood of Bo-Kaap is also known as the Cape Malay Quarter and has a history as colorful as its houses. In the 17th and 18th centuries, this area on Signal Hill was settled by slaves brought by the Dutch East India Co. from Malaysia, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

 

Multicolored houses, La Boca, Caminito, Buenos Aires, Argentina (© Hiroshi Higuchi/Getty Images)

In the Buenos Aires neighborhood of La Boca, they are serious about soccer in this lively harbor town known for its brightly colored houses, especially along Caminito street. The story goes that early residents had to borrow paint from the nearby shipyards, but today the color fits in perfectly with this artist’s neighborhood.

 

Willemstad Waterfront, Curacao, Netherlands Antilles (© Richard Cummins/Corbis)

While the construction of the buildings along the harbor of Curacao is European Baroque, the color palate is uniquely Caribbean: mango-orange, guava-rose, avocado and papaya, to name a few.

 

Art deco style lifeguard hut, South Beach, Miami Beach, Miami, Florida (© Robert Harding Picture Library / SuperStock)

Stroll along Ocean Drive and Washington and Collins avenues and you’ll see the ice-cream-colored  architecture from the 1920s and ’30s that was resurrected with unique Miami flair. More than 800 buildings in Miami Beach and South Beach are now living examples of Art Deco, Mediterranean Revival and Miami Modern styles.

 

THE COLORS MAKE YOU HAPPY AND PLACE A SMILE ON YOUR FACE – ITS LIKE A XMAS PRESENT, YOU’RE READY TO TEAR IT OPEN AND DIVE INSIDE!

 

 

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