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Sun rises behind an irrigation sprinkler near Lubbock, Texas, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. In parched West Texas, it's often easier to drill for oil than to find new sources of water.  After years of dimi

Sun rises behind an irrigation sprinkler near Lubbock, Texas, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2011. In parched West Texas, it’s often easier to drill for oil than to find new sources of water. After years of diminishing water supplies made even worse by the second-most severe drought in state history, some communities are resorting to a plan that might have seemed absurd a generation ago: turning sewage into drinking water.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
 
FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2011 file photo, Eddie Ray Roberts, superintendent of the city's waste and water department walks on the dried bed of Lake E.V. Spence in Robert Lee, Texas. After years of dimin
FILE – In this Aug. 7, 2011 file photo, Eddie Ray Roberts, superintendent of the city’s waste and water department walks on the dried bed of Lake E.V. Spence in Robert Lee, Texas.
 
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